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Encaustic Demo by Susan Ukkola

Encaustic Art Demostration

This is encaustic art demonstration to give you an idea of what painting with wax is all about.


 
 

Content:

   
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Equipment

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Add Texture

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Preparation

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Add more paint

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Add Objects

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Patina

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Add Image Transfer

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Fuse / Sweat

     
     

Step 1: Equipment  | ventilation system

  This is an image of the ventilation system I had custom-built for the health and safety of myself and my students.
  Ventilation is very important when you're working with bee's wax.
  Over-heating bee's wax causes toxic fumes.
  However, my 4 large hotplates are consistently kept at the correct temperature for melting the wax safely.
  Still, some people are sensitive to the sweet aroma, giving them headaches, maybe a little queasy tummy, a feeling of being lightheaded, and even mild respiratory problems.
  For that reason, I went the distance and provided you with a studio where you can explore encaustic painting in a safe and enjoyable environment.

 

Step 2: Prime the wood panel

  Prime the wood panel with Encaustic Medium.
 
Encaustic Demonstration

 

Step 3: Fuse the medium

  Use a heat gun to fuse the medium into the wood panel.
 
Encaustic Demonstration

 

Step 4: Apply first layer of white paint

  Apply the first layer of white encaustic paint on the entire board, going in one direction (i.e. left to right from top to bottom).
  Fuse on with the heat gun.
  You want each fused layer to be as smooth as possible.
 

Encaustic Demonstration

 

Step 5: Apply second layer of white paint

  Apply the second layer of white encaustic paint on the entire board, going in a perpendicular direction than the first layer (to ensure good coverage).
  Re-fuse again with a heat gun, so that the wax is as smooth as possible.
  You want each fused layer to be as smooth as possible.
 
Encaustic Demonstration

 

Step 6: Check for smooth texture

  Here is an up close view of what the encaustic layers look like at this point.
  Wonderful smooth texture and the richness is already apparent.
 
Encaustic Demonstration

Step 7: Add objects

  Here I'm adding organic matter into the warm wax and deciding on my design.
  You may add other objects of your choice, such as paper collage, etc.
 
Encaustic Demonstration
  Using heavy wax paper, I push down so that the objects get into the wax. I will often use a wooden dough roller to push heavier items down.
  When the objects are removed from the wax the impressions remain behind.
 
Encaustic Demonstration

 

Step 8: Add an image transfer

  I've decided to do an image transfer.
  Encaustic Demonstration
  I place the image face side down into the warm wax and I burnish the back of the image with a bone folder or credit card.
  Then lightly sand the back of the paper to open the pours.
  Encaustic Demonstration
  Then I run water over the image as I rub off the paper. The toner will embed into the wax and the paper will disappear.
 

Encaustic Demonstration

  Using a heat gun I will fuse the image to the wax and by doing that the slightly foggy image returns to dark black.
 

Encaustic Demonstration

 

Step 9: Add texture

  I'm adding more marks into the warm wax using anything that will create interesting texture and marks.
  Encaustic Demonstration

 

Step 10: Add more paint

  Here I've added a band of pink encaustic paint as well as some spots of pink at the top.
  Encaustic Demonstration

Step 11: Patina

  Using Raw Umber oil paint, I'm rubbing it all over the surface and making sure the nooks and crannies are well covered. This is referred to as the patina.

  Encaustic Demonstration
  With rags, I remove the oil paint from the surface.
  Add a few drops of linseed oil to remove the residue. The raw umber stays in all the marks I've made.
  Encaustic Demonstration
  Remove all of the oil with a soft cotton rag and drops of linseed oil.
  Encaustic Demonstration

 

Step 12: Final Fuse / Sweat

  A final light fuse (sweat) is required to set in the oil paint.
  Sweat is fusing with the heat gun until you see a glossy surface without melting it.
  And here is the finished piece!
  Encaustic Demonstration
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Encaustic Ventilation Safety First

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Encaustic Demonstration

     
If you have any questions about upcoming encaustic workshops in the studio, drop me a line here.    
Ottawa Woman Magazine | Susan Ukkola